Boom Goes Out: Sneak Peek of ChefBar’s The Slaughter House

Boom Goes Out: Sneak Peek of ChefBar’s The Slaughter House

You’re only as good as the food you eat and the company you keep, and if last night was any indication, then we are divine. Under warm lights and the watchful, lychee eyes of a watermelon-skull-turned-punch-bowl, the BOOM team met up with PR mogul Alex Kingcott, stylist Leah Van Loon, and the curator of the evening, blogger, stylist, entrepreneur, and man-about-town, Vincent Law. The purpose of the evening? To taste ChefBar’s Halloween menu, as prepared by their head chef, Shawn Desauliers, for the restaurant’s transformation on Halloween night into The Slaughter House.  As event designers (and theme addicts) we were delighted by the demonic dishes and creepy concoctions crafted by Chef Desauliers and his staff. We enjoyed “brain fluid” cocktails (refreshing notes of watermelon, lime, and a kick of tequila), lemon quinoa salad (in tiny, jack-o-lantern style oranges) and drool-worthy sriracha pork belly (under a “spider web” of black garlic). After dinner, and a mountain of gourmet, browned-to-your-taste s’mores (nick named the ‘”s’mores-pocalypse” by Vincent), Chef Desauliers took us downstairs for a tour of the Gerry Thomas Gallery, catered exclusively by ChefBar. Clean lines, simple aesthetic, and a built-in bar make this a welcome addition to Calgary’s list of modern event spaces.   Deciding to retire from his position as the executive chef at the Fairmont, Chef Shawn Desauliers decided to open a restaurant in Calgary’s bustling centre that would reflect the type of cooking he enjoyed making at home; simple dishes, made with quality ingredients, all put together with the chef’s unique style. While the food and hand-crafted cocktails are obviously a focus for ChefBar, the restaurant also...
Boom Goes Out: Kaleidoscopic Anamalia by Paul Hardy for the Glenbow Museum

Boom Goes Out: Kaleidoscopic Anamalia by Paul Hardy for the Glenbow Museum

On Thursday, October 15, an intimate gathering of masked creatures congregated at the Glenbow Museum to witness the reveal of Paul Hardy‘s exhibit: Kaleidescopic Anamalia, and to celebrate his curatorial debut. Masks depicting animals from all corners of the globe were delivered to attendees in advance, and they certainly rose to the challenge. Truly, it a mascarade to remember. The evening also featured a stunning runway show and auction. Paul Hardy is the Glenbow Museum’s Artist in Residence. Glenbow’s In Residence program invites diverse artists from a variety of disciplines to interact with the museum’s exhibitions and collections and then create a new work based on their discoveries. Past In Residence artists have included Kris Demeanor, Shane Koyczan, Kent Monkman and Corb Lund. READ: Paul Hardy tackles the Museum Experience, Calgary Herald  The exhibit is a true victory – it includes original designs creating specifically for the exhibition clearly demonstrating Paul Hardy’s signature point of view as well as artifacts and artworks from Glenbow’s vaults that have rarely been exhibited. His inspiration comes from our relationship with animals – across time, language, and culture. “Kaleidoscopic Animalia is an exhibition that taps into current interests in fashion, design and visual culture while exploring big ideas about human creativity, cultural values and the universal interest in animals as art, fashion and culture.” Learn more about the exhibit and its upcoming events via Glenbow Museum. The exhibit will be open until May 22, 2016.     #paulhardy at @glenbowmuseum   The big bad wolf… #paulhardy #fashionshow #fashion #style #design #masquerade A photo posted by Shaun Ford & Co (@shaunfordandco) on Oct 15, 2015 at...
BOOM Goes Out: 36th Annual Calgary Folk Music Festival

BOOM Goes Out: 36th Annual Calgary Folk Music Festival

It’s four in the morning, downtown Calgary. The sun hasn’t yet begun to warm the tops of the skyscrapers, and even though it’s the dead of summer the air still has a cool chill to it. The whole seems quiet, ordinary, yet lining the Princes Island pathway is a strange sight: about a hundred huddled, snoring, Calgarians, sleeping on fluorescent blue tarps, all waiting for the morning moment when they’ll out-speed-walk one another in an attempt to throw their tarps as close to the island’s main stage as possible. Welcome to the thirty-sixth annual Calgary Folk Music Festival, everyone. Over seventy artists from fourteen different countries spent the weekend this July serenading our downtown island with an eclectic mix of keytars, banjo’s, vinyl DJ sets, and full brass bands- just to name a few. Musicians and guests spent their days traveling between smaller stages dispersed throughout the park, where they would see solo shows, or two to three bands would host themed ‘workshops’, jamming on stage in front of hundreds of eager fest-goers. In the evenings, the main stage lit up the grounds with much-anticipated performances from featured musicians, culminating in an evening headliner and an ever-expected, yet somehow-impromptu dance party. Folk Fest has become a celebration of not only music, but the multiculturalism that binds our nation together. A delicious mix of local and international food options available at the park’s entrance delighted Calgary’s palate, and the pop-up market featured wares and works from artisans hailing from all sorts of nooks and crannies of the world. Of course, there’s the music. Whether it was the fiery, daring syncopation...